International Cuisine – Korean Night

I used to work with a girl who would make Chop Chae for every potluck.  She knew I liked it so much, she would make sure I had some extra to take home.  I miss Sonya and that delicious dish.  It’s time to learn how to make it myself.  Turns out, it’s not so difficult.  It’s probably the easiest thing I’ll make all month.  We happened to get a ton of chanterelle mushrooms from a friend who foraged them.  Most other ingredients were already in my pantry and fridge.  I went to Fubonn for the other ingredients, specifically the sweet potato (or glass) noodles.

It’s a pretty basic Korean stir fry with noodles, beef, mushrooms, carrots, spinach, soy sauce, and sesame sauce.

photo 1 (9) photo 2 (10)It turned out delicious and I will definitely make it again for a healthy and delicious meal.  While at Fubonn, I decided to pick up Korean wine, unsure what makes it distinctively Korean.

photo 3 (11)The first thing you notice is the horrible smell that travels slowly up your nostrils and tells you this is a bad idea.  Unfortunately for me, I don’t listen, and dive right in to a big sip.  It tastes just like it smells.  Like rotten fruit mixed with syrup.  There is about 3/4 of a bottle in my fridge if anyone is interested in what that tastes like.

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International Cuisine – French Day

Now, a few of you might argue that International Cuisine month should be all about me learning how to cook international cuisine.  Well, today I just felt like sitting outside a cafe, riding bikes, enjoying the stillness, and musing about the world… how French is that?  A-huhn-huhn-huhn (that’s how you spell a French laugh.)

Rode my French mixtie Roux down to Belmont.  It’s a beautiful fall day where the leaves are turning, the sun is out, and the weather is just starting to turn.

riding bikes

 

I decide to finally try Suzette, a Creperie with some outdoor seating that makes for some good people watching.  I had a delicious salad, coffee, and crepe filled with harissa, goat cheese, spinach, and salmon.  It was a beautiful meal and even more beautiful day.

photo 3 (10) photo 2 (9)

International Cuisine – Italian Night

I’ve had a pasta maker for a while, handling it more times to move it from one place to another more so than to actually make pasta.  I even have a ravioli attachment that I haven’t ever used.  Time to change that.

I found an amazing recipe for a simple tomato sauce.  Very simple flavors that simmer in the sauce and are strained at the end.  It slowly cooked down and the flavors developed most of the afternoon before packing it up and taking on the road.  Italian Cuisine month has seen many people volunteer to host parties in exchange for delicious food.  At the behest of the Italian Night host, I also made tiramisu from a recipe online.  This is where it gets tricky. Do you know how many websites claim to have THE BEST TIRAMISU recipe??  I had to narrow it down to one best, but I think I chose wrong, so I won’t be sharing the link.

MMM... mascarponetiramisu

After packing up the tiramisu, sauce, and ingredients, we headed out.  I started rolling out pasta while Casey set up the USnaps booth, which he runs on the weekends.  And, oh yeah.  There was lots of wine.

I mixed up the pasta dough and rolled out some sheets for ravioli and cut some for spaghetti.  I had some solid help too!

mixin dough IMG_1235 IMG_1239

 

I didn’t think the ravioli was going to turn out because the dough kept breaking and leaking the filling.  So we put the ricotta filling on top of the spaghetti noodles and drizzled the sauce on top.  It was delicious!

In Retrospect of Bicycle Month

77.61 miles traveled this month by bicycle.  So, I think it should be mentioned that PBM had a lot to do with the success of this month.  He found a sweet bike for me, fixed it up, fixed it again, fixed it some more, and reminded me that it’s all worth it.

He has a lot more to say on this subject than I ever could.  So I asked him to write about bikes.  No other rules.  Just write about bikes for my blog.  Knowing PBM, AKA Scott Baker, I half-expected to get a stack of damp pages, poured over on a typewriter.  Each letter of each word carefully thought out and put on paper with only the power of his elegant machine and his twisting fingers, fighting to put the thoughts to paper as fast as they come.  Thankfully, he knew I would have to re-type whatever he gave me, so he was kind enough to email it to me.

I think it should be mentioned that in addition to saving young women from the perils of bikelessness, he also makes pretty amazing music under the name Simple Heart.  If nothing else, you should open another tab http://simpleheart.bandcamp.com/  and play “Lucky Strike” while reading his musings.  But seriously, he’s a bike mechanic.  So you should totally buy the album, and also take him out and buy him a drink and/or a hot meal.

A Poem About Bikes In Downtown Portland

i take to the night in cadences unexplored
i do not pioneer or arrive in prime
it feels a sort of slither,
a waltz swung out of time
a dog that catches his own tail
an eighth of a measure
before the metronome breaks the spell.

tonight is a magpie stood in front of a mirror, wondering
how handsome
how black
how near

the wind rushes
(but I do not)
my patience is rewarded
and the city bows at my request,
its green lights flowing
to the emperor in my chest.

of the somnambulisms that I wander there is one I cherish most,
its path a plain, pinched charity to its walking, waking host.

 

Scott Baker, PBM

Bike Ride – VI

Last ride of the month.  Time to go big.  Want to get more than 20 miles in one shot.  It’ll be my longest bike ride yet.  I bring along PBM just in case his personal bike mechanic skills are required and also because he’s kinda cool.

Meet him outside PAM and jet across the river to hop on the Springwater Corridor.  This is a bike/hike/walk path that starts on the Eastbank Esplanade and goes all the way to Gresham.  It’s a really easy path, crosses intersections rarely and has very minimal elevation changes.

We take it out to mile marker 12.5 so that we can hit an even 25 miles.  This was around SE 128th Street.  Not quite to Gresham, but good enough for me.  Took a short water break and headed back to town.

mile post 12.5

 

On the way back, PBM commented that it was nice to take it slow and have time to take in the scenery.  I was pretty sure we were going fast until that point.  My legs felt a bit like jell-o and every time we had to stop, it was increasingly more difficult to start up again.  The ass pain was back and I shifted frequently to find a more comfortable position that didn’t exist.

When I got home and mapped our route, it turned out to be 25.97 miles in a little over 2.5 hours.  I was almost slightly heartbroken that it didn’t reach the marathon length, but I guess that’s a goal for next time.  25.97 miles is a new record for me.  A record that signifies the distance my own exerted energy can take me in literal miles.  My own exerted energy has taken me a lot of places and has done a lot of amazing things, but this is a quantifiable figure.  An immediate gratification for a thoughtful and physical endeavor.  And it wasn’t that hard.  I can do two times that distance, after a bit more practice I imagine.

Cyclepedia

Went to the bike exhibit at the Portland Art Museum this morning.  Pretty excited there just so happens to be a bike exhibit during bike month.  It’s the first time I’ve ever been to an exhibit here and was surprised at the $15 admission fee.  The exhibit took up one very large room and had 40 different bikes hanging from the ceiling with descriptions of how they broke the bike mold or influenced different trends.

I was hoping for more.  I had thought it would be an evolution of the bicycle.  Not to say that it wasn’t informative and cool to see, because it was.  There were several bikes built to fold in half or more to be used as carry-on luggage or be hurled out of an airplane for military use.

PAM Cyclepedia

 

That yellow tandem “buddy bike” can only be used with two people.  The one on the left controls the steering even though they both have independent handlebars.  There was also one so rare and priceless that was blinged out with a gold chain.  So fancy!

biria unplugged